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ITR 2013 - Saint-Philbert-du-Peuple
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Tandem 2002

United Kingdom National Tandem Rally

Barnsoul Farm, Irongray, Dumfries, Scotland

Saturday, 10th – Saturday, 17th August 2002

Tandem 2002 logo


Introduction

Dumfries is situated in the south west of Scotland and the rally was based at Barnsoul Farm. The camping area at the farm was extended to make sufficient room for the Tandem Club. Three hundred and forty people enrolled for this event, including many who had not attended a Tandem Club rally before.



Barnsoul campsite


The terrain in the area is quite hilly and mainly given over to farmland. The area is very remote, in terms of population, and very beautiful.



From 09:00-10:00 each morning there were activities for children, with some parents taking a more than active part...



Long, medium and short route sheets were provided on most days with lots of interesting places to see along the way. An enormous effort had gone into the production of these sheets and we have copied below, some of the places that could be visited. However, it must be said that it was necessary to do the long rides to get to them all.



On most evenings there was also something organised to do.




Day 1: Saturday, 10th August



Points of Interest throughout the rides: -



Ellisland Farm Ellisland Farm: Home of Robert Burns 1788-1791. Described as the most interesting of all his sites, the Farmhouse and steading reflect his life here, with plenty of original memorabilia. Riverside walk, heritage trail, farming exhibits



Drumlanrig Castle: The Dumfriesshire home of the Duke of Buccleuch features a craft courtyard, adventure playground, cycle museum and walks.



Wanlockhead: Situated in Scotland's highest village, the Museum of Lead Mining features an underground lead mine, cottages and miners' library. This would be good for wet weather, as there are guided underground tours. Gold Panning and mineral/artifact display. Tearoom.




Evening activity:



The Opening Ceremony: In which the Provost of Dumfries & Galloway addressed us and in which alcohol was provided free...




Day 2: Sunday, 11th August



Points of Interest throughout the rides: -



Shambellie House Museum of Costume: Sited on two floors of a country house in beautiful woodland this is an experience of Victorian and Edwardian grace and refinement. Temporary exhibitions which include clothes worn by film stars in recent years (Mel Gibson, Nicole Kidman and TV stars such as Joanne Lumley). Run by the Royal Scottish Museum, Shop, tearoom, picnic area and wooded grounds.



Newabbey Corn Mill: Renovated 18th century water powered oatmeal mill in full working order. Demonstrations are given for visitors. Owned by Historic Scotland.



Sweetheart Abbey Sweetheart Abbey: The splendid remains of a late 13th/early 14th century Cistercian Abbey founded by Devorgilla, Lady of Galloway, in memory of her husband John Balliol (King of Scotland and founder of Balliol College Oxford). Devorgilla is buried in the presbytery with a casket of silver and ivory containing her husband's embalmed heart. The red sandstone walls and tower are intact but the roof is gone.



Criffel: If you fancy a walk then this little mountain just South of New Abbey provides lovely views of the Lake District and the Solway area. At 569 meters it dominates the area.



Barcloy Barn: Situated on East Barcloy Farm, the shop sells Portuguese pottery, hand loom weaving, leather goods and Portuguese Olive Oil. There is a museum of old farm implements and strawberries are sold in season.



John Paul Jones Museum and visitors centre: Exhibition of the life of the 'father of the American Navy'. Features an audio-visual display in the reconstructed cabin of Jones's ship, the Bonhomme Richard. This is a perfect picnic spot for breathtaking views across the Solway Firth to the Lake District. Shop.



Mersehead Nature Reserve: Extensive wetlands managed by the RSPB. Features salt marsh and inter tidal areas on the north shore of the Solway. You can spot waders, wintering wildfowl all year round. Information centre, nature trails, displays.



Rockcliffe: A pretty village situated on the Rough Firth. Also known as the Scottish Riviera! On the edge of the village is the Motte of Mark which is an ancient hill fort affording lovely views over the Urr estuary as well as the bird sanctuary at Rough Island that can be visited at low tide.



Motte of Urr: Dating from the 12th century, this Motte and Bailey earthwork covers 5 acres and is the most extensive bailey earthwork in Scotland. There are no excavations or walls but there is a sense of scale.



Threave Gardens and Estate: Owned by the National Trust for Scotland, this is a garden for all seasons, with colourful displays throughout the year. Visitor centre, restaurant and plant centre.



Threave Castle: A massive tower, situated on an island in the River Dee. Built by the Archibald of Grim in the late 14th century, and was later the stronghold of the Black Douglases.



Threave Wildfowl Reserve: Regularly visited by breeding wading birds and wintering wildfowl. Bird Hides.




Evening activity:



Slide Show: of previous Tandem Rallies etc.




Day 3: Monday, 12th August



Velocio Trophy:



King & Queen without shoes This was the day of the Velocio Trophy competition. The route sheets, which were given out at the start, contained lots of questions which had to be answered along the way. The event was also timed, so hanging about en route was not to be considered for those interested in winning the event. Most people did it for fun whilst others took it very seriously.




Slow Ride Evening activity:



Tandem (and non Tandem) Games: The evening started with Welly throwing - with smaller wellies for kids. It's surprising how hard they are to throw very far! There was a Tandem Slow Ride where balance was everything and a Water Pistol game in which tandem stokers had to fire water at targets... Anarchy amongst the younger stokers was kept to a minimum!




Day 4: Tuesday, 13th August



Points of Interest throughout the rides: -



Kirkudbright: This lovely harbour town, on the mouth of the river Dee, is full of 17th and 18th century Merchant houses. Built in 1582, MacLellan's castle is a large ruin near the harbour. The town's artistic heritage is celebrated at the Tollbooth Arts Centre which displays works both past and present. One of the most famous artists was Edward Hornel (1864-1933) he lived at Broughton house, which is now the Hornel Gallery. You can also visit the garden, which is lovely. One mile to the east is the Wildlife Park. This zoo and wildlife park features monkeys, pandas and native animals such as the Scottish Wildcat.



Threave Gardens and Estate: Owned by the National Trust for Scotland, this is a garden for all seasons, with colourful displays throughout the year. Visitor centre, restaurant and plant centre.



Threave Castle: A massive tower, situated on an island in the River Dee. Built by the Archibald of Grim in the late 14th century, and was later the stronghold of the Black Douglases. Ring the bell and the custodian will ferry you over.



Threave Wildfowl Reserve: Regularly visited by breeding wading birds and wintering wildfowl. Bird Hides.




Evening activity:



Ceilidh Meal & Ceilidh: In which outside caterers came to the campsite with food and we then danced the night away to the sounds of a Scottish country band.




Day 5: Wednesday, 14th August



Points of Interest throughout the rides: -



Belted Galloways Free Day: A day with no specified routes and in which we could please ourselves. Not much different to the other days in this last respect. However, some heavy rain in the morning did curtail some cycling.




Evening activity:



Camp Fire: In which marshmallow toasting was the main feature.




Day 6: Thursday, 15th August



Points of Interest throughout the rides: -



Threave Gardens and Estate: Owned by the National Trust for Scotland, this is a garden for all seasons, with colourful displays throughout the year. Visitor centre, restaurant and plant centre.



Threave Castle: A massive tower, situated on an island in the River Dee. Built by the Archibald of Grim in the late 14th century, and was later the stronghold of the Black Douglases. Ring the bell and the custodian will ferry you across the river.



Threave Wildfowl Reserve: Regularly visited by breeding wading birds and wintering wildfowl. Bird Hides.



Tongland: Built in the 1930's, the Tongland Power Station now incorporates the Galloway Hydro Visitors Centre. You can tour the station, view the dam and check out the fish ladder.



Coulthard Museum Twynholm: There is plenty of relevant memorabilia at the David Coulthard Museum and Pit Stop Diner. His career continues but his past is well illustrated from Go carts to Formula One.



Gatehouse of Fleet: Sited on the high street is the Mill on the Fleet. The 18th century mill building has been restored and features 2 water wheels. There is a model of the Burgh 200 years ago, historical displays and a café. On the western side of town is Cardoness castle. This four-storey tower house was the home of the McCullochs and stands on a rocky platform above the Water of Fleet.



Carsluith Castle: The well preserved ruin was built in the 16th century. One of the owners was the last Abbott at Sweetheart Abbey. The ruins and the 18th century outhouses are free to visit.



Creetown: The history of the local area is illustrated in the Creetown Exhibition Centre. There is also wartime memorabilia and exhibitions by local artists. One of the largest collections of gemstones, crystals and minerals in private hands is displayed at the Gemrock museum.




Evening activity:



Hill Climb Hill Climb: Within the campsite, it was quite a stiff climb from the road to the first camping field. Ideal terrain for a tandem and kids hill climb event with classes for all male tandem crews, all female tandem crews, mixed tandem crews and children under 12 on solos.



Click here for Hill Climb results sheet

Click here for slide show of some of the Hill Climb competitors


Day 7: Friday, 16th August



Points of Interest throughout the rides: -



Caerraverock Castle Caerlaverock Castle: Built in around 1270 Caerlaverock Castle is everyone's idea of a castle. Surrounded by a double moat and besieged by both Edward 1st in 1300 and retaken by Robert the Bruce in 1312. It was remodelled by the Earl of Nithsdale in 1634 but was wrecked and abandoned 6 years later. There is a children's adventure park, model siege engine and nature trail.



Caerlaverock Wildfowl and Wetlands Centre: Lining the Solway Firth the Caerlaverock Wildfowl and Wetlands Centre comprises 13,594 acres of protected salt marsh, merse, meadows and mud.




Evening activity:



Barbecue Barbecue: It has become something of a tradition at Tandem Club Rallies to have a barbecue on the last evening and this rally was no exception with people using the opportunity for a final get together.




Day 8: Saturday, 17th August




Another excellent Tandem Club Rally had come to an end. Just the packing up and going home to be done :(



Click here for picture slide show




pictures on this page by Tricia Anderson Neville Frost



Barnsoul Farm - a good place for a camping holiday: - http://www.barnsoulfarm.co.uk/